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As I Roved Out

As I Roved Out published on

Who are you, my pretty fair maid,
And Who are you, me honey?
And who are you, my pretty fair maid,
And who are you, me honey?
She answered me quite modestly,
“I am me mother’s darling.”

With me
Too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-dah Di-de-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh

Will you come to me mother’s house,
When the moon is shining clearly?
And will you come to me mother’s house
When the moon is shining clearly?
I’ll open the door and I’ll let you in
And divil ‘o one will hear us

Chorus

I went to her house in the middle of the night
When the moon was shining clearly
So I went to her house in the middle of the night
When the moon was shining clearly
She opened the door and she let me in
And divil the one did hear us

Chorus

She took me horse by the bridle and the bit
And led him to the stable
She took me horse by the bridle and the bit
And led him to the stable
“There’s plenty of oats for a soldier’s horse,
To eat it if he is able.”

Chorus

She took me by the lily-white hand
And she led me to the table
She took me by the lily-white hand
And she led me to the table
“There’s plenty of wine for a soldier boy,
To drink if he is able.”

Chorus

Then I got up and I made the bed
I made it nice and aisy
Then I got up and I made the bed
I made it nice and aisy
I picked her up and I laid her down
Saying “Lassie, are you able?”

Chorus

There we lay till the break of day
Divil the one did hear us
And there we lay till the break of day
And divil the one did hear us
Then I arose and put on me clothes
Saying “Lassie, I must leave you.”

Chorus

When will you return again
And when will we get married?
When will you return again
And when will we get married?
When broken shells make Christmas bells
We might then get married.

Chorus

Who are you, my pretty fair maid,
And Who are you, me honey?
And who are you, my pretty fair maid,
And who are you, me honey?
She answered me quite modestly,
“I am me mother’s darling.”

Yarmouth Town

Yarmouth Town published on

In Yarmouth town there lived a man
He had a little tavern by the strand
And the landlord had a daughter fair
Pretty little thing with golden hair

Won’t you come down
Won’t you come down
Won’t you come down to Yarmouth town

One night there came a sailor man
He asked the daughter for her hand
Well I won’t marry you she said
I have all I want without being wed
But if with me you’d like to linger
I’ll tie some string all around my finger
As you walk by, pull on my string
I’ll come down and let you right in

Well the very next day at closing time
The sailor man goes off to the strand
And as he walks by pulls on that string
And she came down and let him right in
Well he’s never such a sight before
A string around her finger was all she wore!

So all you men who to Yarmouth go
If ya see those girls with their hair hung low
All ya gotta do is pull their strings
And they’ll come down and let you right in

Wind and Rain

Wind and Rain published on

There were two sisters of county Clair
Oh, the wind and rain
One was dark and the other was fair
Oh, the dreadful wind and rain

And they both had a love of the miller’s son
But he was fond of the fairer one

So she pushed her into the river to drown
And watched her as she floated down

And she floated till she came to the miller’s pond
Dead on the water like a golden swan

As she came to rest on the riverside
And her bones were washed by the rolling tide

And along the road came a fiddler fair
And found her bones just a lying there, cried

So he made a fiddle peg of her long finger bone
He a made a fiddle peg of her long finger bone, crying

And he strung his fiddle bow with her long yellow hair
He strung his fiddle bow with her long yellow hair, cried

And he made a fiddle, fiddle of her breast bone
He made a fiddle, fiddle of her breast bone, cried

But the only tune that the fiddle could play was
The only tune that the fiddle would play was

Wild Rover

Wild Rover published on

I’ve been a wild rover for many the’s year
And I spent all my money on whiskey and beer,
And now I’m returning with gold in great store
And I never will play the wild rover no more.

And it’s no, nay, never,
No nay never no more,
Will I play the wild rover
No never no more.

I went into an ale-house I used to frequent
And I told the landlady my money was spent.
I asked her for credit, she answered me “Nay
Such a custom as yours I could have any day.”

I took from my pocket ten sovereigns bright
And the landlady’s eyes opened wide with delight.
She said “I have whiskey and wines of the best
And the words that I spoke sure were only in jest.”

I’ll go home to my parents, confess what I’ve done
And I’ll ask them to pardon their prodigal son.
And if they caress me as oftimes before
Then I never will play the wild rover no more.

Whiskey in the Jar

Whiskey in the Jar published on

As I was a goin’ over the far famed Kerry mountains
I met with Captain Farrell and his money he was counting
I first produced my pistol and I then produced me rapier
Saying “Stand and deliver” for he were a bold deceiver

Mush-a ring dumb-a do dumb-a da
Wack fall the daddy-o, wack fall the daddy-o
There’s whiskey in the jar

I counted out his money and it made a pretty penny
I put it in me pocket and I took it home to Jenny
She sighed and she swore that she never would deceive me
But the devil take the women for they never can be easy

I went unto my chamber, all for to take a slumber
I dreamt of gold and jewels and for sure ‘t was no wonder
But Jenny blew me charges and she filled them up with water
Then sent for Captain Farrell to be ready for the slaughter

‘Twas early in the morning, just before I rose to travel
Up comes a band of footmen and likewise Captain Farrell
I first produced me pistol for she stole away me rapier
I couldn’t shoot the water, so a prisoner I was taken

There’s some take delight in the carriages a rolling
And others take delight in the hurling and the bowling
But I take delight in the juice of the barley
And courting pretty fair maids in the morning bright and early

If anyone can aid me ‘t is my brother in the army
If I can find his station in Cork or in Killarney
And if he’ll go with me, we’ll go rovin’ in Killkenney
And I’m sure he’ll treat me better than my own a-sporting Jenny

What Care We

What Care We published on

Oh what care we for the farmer’s life when you’re hauling grain all day
When the neighbours stare and the tempers flare,you can’t blow them away

What care we for the surgeon’s life, broken legs and busted jaws
Where there’s blood and gore and often more that you didn’t get to cause

What care we for the blacksmith’s life, though it seems inhumane
For the pokers burn and sizzle, but you don’t cause no one pain

What care we for the butcher’s life, though it might seem a dream
For you hack and stab and slash and spike, but you never hears them scream

There are some that want life’s quiet, and then there are a few
Who seeks a wild adventure, and perhaps some violence too

What makes the blood grow hot in your veins and pass from the farm you flee
Don’t look to your left for the love of your life, instead hear the call of the sea
And a life of piracy!

Tell My Ma

Tell My Ma published on

Tell my ma when I get home,
The boys won’t leave the girls alone
They pulled my hair and stole my comb
But that’s all right till I go home

She is handsome, she is pretty,
She is the Belle of Belfast city
She is courtin’ one, two, three,
Please won’t you tell me who is she

Albert Mooney says he loves her,
All the boys are fightin’ for her
Knock on the door and then ring the bell,
Oh my true love, are you well
Here she comes as white as snow,
Rings on her fingers, and bells on her toes
Old Johnny, Mary says she’ll die
If she doesn’t get the fella with the roving eye

Let the wind and the rain and the hail blow high
And the snow come tumblin’ from the sky
She’s as nice as apple pie,
She’ll get her own boy by and by
When she gets a lad of her own
She won’t tell her me til she comes home
Let the boys stay as they will
For it’s Albert Mooney she loves still

The Tailor

The Tailor published on

I’m a long way from my home
I was born on the raging sea
And when I first struck land,
With my head in hand
I built a house out of an old oak tree
And raised a family out of earth and electricity
I was king of my domain
But my fortitude had proved in vain
And when the locusts came
Like a summer rain
Devouring everything that I held dear
And all I’d worked for simply disappeared
So I crept away
For I had debts to pay
And joined the army as a privateer
Yeah, it was then, the wind it whispered
But I would not hear

So we sailed out across the land
Through an ocean made of sinking sand
And though I lost my men,
I was born again
As a tailor in an unknown land
With a needle and some thread in hand
Mending suits and slacks,
Stitching up the cracks
In the backs of my neighbors’ heads
And soon the word, yeah, of my work,
it spread through the town

So before the king I stood
I said, “I come from the raging sea
And if the truth be told,
I am not so old
As you may first have taken me to be
For numbers never could apply to me
For I’m as old as time,
And maybe half as blind
What some of you might call infinity
I am the tailor of the earth and electricity.”

The Swimming Song

The Swimming Song published on

This summer I went swimming
This summer I might have drowned
But I held my breath, and I kicked my feet
And I moved my arms around
I moved my arms around

This summer I swam in the ocean
And I swam in a swimming pool
Salt my wounds, chlorined my eyes
I’m a self-destructive fool
Self-destructive fool

This summer I did the back stroke
And you know that that’s not all
I did the breast stroke, and the butterfly
And the old Australian crawl
The old Australian crawl

This summer I swam in a public place
And a reservoir to boot
At the latter I was informal
At the former I wore my suit
I wore my swimming suit

Oh, this summer I did swan dives
And jack-knives for you all
And once when you weren’t looking
I did a cannon-ball
I did a cannon-ball

This summer I went swimming
This summer I might have drowned
But I held my breath, and I kicked my feet
And I moved my arms around
I moved my arms around

Step It Out Mary

Step It Out Mary published on

Step it out, Mary, my fine daughter
Step it out, Mary, if you can
Step it out, Mary, my fine daughter
Show your legs to the countryman

In the village of Kilgory, there’s a maiden young and fair
Her eyes they shine like diamonds, she has long and golden hair
The countryman came riding, he came to her father’s gate
Mounted on a milk-white stallion, he came at the strike of eight.

I have come to wed your daughter, Mary of the golden hair
I have gold and I have silver, I have wealth beyond compare
And I’ll buy her silks and satins and a gold ring for her hand
I’ll build for her a mansion, she’ll have servants to command

Kind sir, I have another, I have pledged to him my hand
I don’t want your gold nor silver, I don’t want your wealth nor land
Mary’s father spoke up sharply “You will do as you are told,
You’ll be married here next Sunday and you’ll wear the ring of gold”

In the village of Kilgory there’s a deep stream running by
You’ll find Mary there at midnight as she drowns there with her boy
In the village there’ll be music, and you’ll hear her father say:
“Step it out, Mary, my fine daughter, Sunday is your wedding day.”

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